CATEGORY: ARCHITECTURE

Source: archdaily.com

4 Uniquely Designed High-Fashion
Retail Destinations

These amazing fashion boutiques have captured the essence, the story and the vision of the brand and offer much more than an average shopping experience.

#1 The House Of Dior, Seoul​

Christian Dior’s Flagship store in Seoul, South Korea, is the work of French architect Christian de Portzamprac and Peter Marino who designed the interior. The high fashion boutique is situated inside a six storey building shaped in Dior’s haute couture silhouette.

The interior decor features wood, leathers, lacquers, sensual weaves and innovative melanges, accentuating the feminine character and Dior’s signature style. The focal point of the interior is the curving staircase envisioned as an unfurling ribbon that guides shoppers to the upper level to reveal the newest women’s and men’s departments.

Apart from the fashion house, the House of Dior includes an exhibition place and a Dior Café situated on the top floor. The Café is run by a famous Pastry Chef Pierre Hermé who has developed an exclusive menu for the House.

 

Source: archdaily.com
Source: pursuitits.com
Source: pursuitits.com
Source: dezeen.com
Source: pursuitits.com

#2 Armani Flagship Store, Milan

Designed by Giorgio Armani himself and his team of architects, the focus was to keep the historic geometrical features of the building and to lead it into the interior as well.

The store spreads over 1,082 square meters and 3 floors. Sales area covers 1000 square meters with ground floor dedicated to women’s clothing, menswear on first, with separate fragrance and accessories departments within, and areas for made-to-measure and pret-a-porter gowns. The complete store was customised and furnished with the latest designs from the new Armani Casa collection.

  A grand elliptical staircase is definitely the heart and the highlight of the space. The essence of Armani’s refined luxury is captured in this custom made a high-impact design in metal with platinum-finish steps in extra-white onyx. Every room is customised, flooring made of marble and onyx, matching the printed silk lining on the walls shifting in colour from petrol blue, silver, dark green to ivory.

 

 

Source: luxuo.com
Source: luxuo.com
Source: luxuo.com
Source: www.twitter.com
Source: luxuo.com

#3 Hermes Flagship Store, Hong Kong

Hermès flagship store located in the heart of Central Hong Kong, at the street corner of Landmark Prince’s building,  spans across three floors on more than 836 000 m2.         

 As the biggest store among forty Hermes stores in Hong Kong, China and Taiwan, it features all products that Hermès has to offer; from silk items, leather goods and jewellery, to furniture,  and a private lounge for made-to-measure customers. 

The building features a captivating facade in brand’s signature colour, forming a big, vibrant orange box to the backdrop of the concrete jungle. Designed and built by the Parisian architecture agency RDAI under the artistic direction of Denis Montel, the building design draws its stylistic influences from local architecture. Inspired by bamboo scaffolding construction techniques, the copper-coloured anodised aluminium façade asserts the rhythm and verticality of bamboo.

 

Source: www.scmp.com
Source: www.scmp.com
Source: www.scmp.com
Source: www.scmp.com
Source:www.philstar.com
Source: www.scmp.com

#4 Gucci Garden, Florence

Alessandro Michele, Creative director for Gucci, is a mastermind behind this unique project that blends fashion, interior design and gastronomy within one vibrant conceptual experience. For this venture, Michele has redesigned the historic Palazzo della Mercanzia in Florence, which dates back to 1337.

Gucci Garden houses a fashion boutique with one-of-a-kind products, a museum, archives area, phantasmagorical souvenir shop, and a bookstore.

The concept also includes a unique dining experience which is the first gastronomy venture for Gucci. Gucci Osteria da Massimo Bottura is headed by triple-starred Michelin chef Massimo Bottura.

With Gucci Garden, Alessandro Michele wanted to pay homage to Florence, the brand’s birthplace.

 

Source: www.standard.co.uk
www.standard.co.uk
www.standard.co.uk
www.gucci.com
www.vogue.it

INTERIOR DESIGN | 5 Easy Ways to Achieve Industrial Loft Look in the Modern Home​

5 Easy Ways to Achieve Industrial Loft Look in the Modern Home

Source: zonnelux.com

The industrial style emerged in the 50s from New York lofts, and it’s a common design expression in restored industrial spaces, factories, and warehouses. However, the urban vibe and a budget-friendly character turned this interior style into one of the favourites in modern homes around the globe. The main characteristic of Loft living is the open space and the possibility to bring together different areas within a single space.

#1 When striping it down to the bone is not an option

One of the staples of industrial decorating style is exposing raw architectural elements and fixtures: striping it to the bone is the most recognisable characteristic of the style. However, this is easy to do if you live in a renovated factory where seasoned brick or raw concrete decorate the walls. When exposing your walls is not an option, wallpaper is the next best thing. Thanks to advanced technology that we have today, wallcoverings or murals that imitate brick or concrete, can hardly be distinguished from the real thing.

Source:homedecor.nl

#2 The Working Kitchen

Source: pinterest.com

When it comes to kitchens, the industrial design allows freedom of creativity like no other style. Playing with salvaged materials and textures always generates a unique result. Industrial kitchens are reduced to bare function and remind of workstations. Using miss-matched vintage pieces and open shelving will increase the performance and create a robust looking kitchen that bursts with personality. In an open space, a kitchen naturally comes to the fore and sets the tone for the rest of the area.

Source: pinterest.com

#3 Naked Lighting

Source: machomoda.com.br

Lighting is a vital element in the industrial design. Captivating yet straightforward, lighting fixtures have become symbols of the style. Lighting design in the industrial ambiance magnifies the essence and the sheer beauty of the function.

Source.ultralinx.com

#4 Design has to work; Art doesn’t.

Source: pinterest.com

Using various wall art will enhance the cool, urban, vibe: from gallery walls featuring vintage posters and interesting frames to bold murals and oversized clocks; wall art will give content to the space.

Source: pinterest.com

#5 Details make the design

Source: pinterest.com

Last, but not least, the details are fundamental to the overall impression. Robust pipe shelving, vintage accessories and statement pieces of furniture will get the message out.

Source: mydomaine.com

CATEGORY: CLICK & STYLE

The Subtle Gleam of Gold

The warming nature of gold is alluring and adds gleaming yet soft tone to the room. Gold details make great accents in living rooms and bedrooms, where paired with rich textures enhance the sense of warmth and comfort. When decorating with gold, keep it simple for a clean and refined look. Infuse gold accents subtly throughout the space, allowing a few key details to steal the spotlight

ARCHITECTURE | BJARKE INGELS

Bjarke Ingels

Source:facebook.com/BIG

He is just in the early forties, and he already owns the status of one of the most inventive architects of today, leaving a remarkable imprint on the world’s greatest building site, The New York City. To put this into perspective, Frank Gehry, was 78 when his first New York project was completed.

His company Bjarke Ingels Group, known as BIG, founded in 2005 in Copenhagen, Denmark, now works from two offices, one in Copenhagen, and one in New York, employs around 400 people and runs projects all over the world. Despite the fact, that Bjarke himself could not register as an architect in the U.S., as his education,  from both Barcelona’s Tecnica Superior d’Arquitectura and the Royal Danish Academy of fine arts in Copenhagen, was not acknowledged by authorities, his is redesigning New York’s skyline, thanks to BIG’s partners.

BIG’s first completed and most compelling New York project is a tetrahedral residential building, a compound of a typical Manhattan skyscraper and the European perimeter block, enclosing a large rectangular courtyard. VIA 57 WEST is shaped around the courtyard in a way to allow views of the Hudson River from mostly all apartments, and its striking silhouette has an immense impact on New York’s skyline.  VIA 57 WEST is listed in Metropolis Magazine’s ‘Best Architecture Projects of the 21st Century

Via 57 West, New York (Source: arhdaily.com)

BIG’s other New York projects include a 65 -storey office tower named Spiral, a part of Hudson Yards apartment development on Manhattan’s West side distinguished by planted terraces spiraling and cascading the glass skyscraper and extending green areas of the High Lane Park.

76 11 Avenue,  or Eleven, consists of two mixed-use twisting towers situated in Chelsea neighbourhood and when completed will join an impressive crowd, as the developments in this area carry signatures of Zaha Hadid, Renzo Piano, and Jean Nouvel.

The second tallest tower in the Two World Trade Center is inspired by a stack of staggered boxes. Bjarke Ingels Group ousted the original architect of this project, Foster+ Partners.

Just some of BIG’s other significant work includes Google campus in California, Lego House in Denmark, and Singapore’s tallest building  (collaboration with Carlo Ratti Associates) that will feature vertical gardens and an indoor oasis. 

Two Worlds Trade Center, New York (Source:dezeen.com)
Via 57 West, New York (Source:theplanbmagazine.com)


Hedonistic Sustainability

Ingels is a visionary and a nonconformist; he insists on pursuing the uphill route of his visions. Driven by curiosity, he finds the incitement in the perplexity of dealing with the clashing forces and digs deeper to discover new solutions to old questions.

Always emphasising sustainable development and sociological concepts in his designs, he likes to point out that the purpose of his work is not the architecture itself, but the quality of life achieved with the architecture as the platform. The goal is the architecture that is inviting, responds to people’s needs,  inspire them, and allow them to evolve.

Ingels advocates hedonistic sustainability, the term that explains the quality of life that is improved by sustainable development, instead of being partly sacrificed with it.

 One of the best examples of hedonistic sustainability is BIG’s power plant project in Copenhagen that generates energy from waste and doubles as a ski slope and a recreation park.

 

Ski Slope Power Plant, Copenhagen, Denmark (Source:facebook.com/BIG)

BIG & JPE Design Studio in the Competition for Adelaide Contemporary

Source:https://malcolmreading.co.uk

Bjarke Ingels Group and Adelaide’s JPE Design Studio are one of the six shortlisted teams with architect’s lead in the International Competition for Adelaide Contemporary; a new landmark on Adelaide’s historical North Terrace Boulevard. Adelaide Contemporary will combine a contemporary art gallery with a public

sculpture park and meeting place. The initiative will be a focus for the city’s cultural energies and create an accessible community meeting place, integrating art, education, nature and people.

We are looking forward to seeing the winner of the competition in early June (2018), hoping too see BIG’s first project in Australia.

Lego house, Billund, Denmark (Source:designboom.com)

CLICK&STYLE CONCEPT BOARD | OUTDOOR LIVING

Australian Equivalent of Hygge

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In 2017, Denmark took the title of the happiest country in the world. According to Meik Wiking from the Happiness Research Institute in Copenhagen and the author of the bestseller “The Little Book of Hygee; The Danish Way to Live Well”, there is a strong link between happiness and Hygge (hoo-gah) in Denmark.

“Danes are the happiest people in Europe, but they are also the ones who meet most often with their friends and family and feel the calmest and most peaceful. Therefore, it is with good reason that we see a growing interest in Hygge. Journalists are touring Denmark searching for Hygge; in the UK, a college is now teaching Danish Hygge; and around the world hygge bakeries, shops and cafes are popping up”’.

Hygge doesn’t directly translate to English, but it can be explained as wellbeing, comfort, togetherness, warmth. Hygge is particularly practised during the winter season when deprived of sun rays and natural daylight; Danes turn to the cosiness of their homes and enjoy the company of family and friends. They invest in the atmosphere rather than in things and celebrate the simple pleasures in life; like having hot cocoa by the candlelight or a relaxing movie night with friends.
Although the winter season naturally provides the most hyggelig (hygge-like) moments, Danes enjoy Hygge all year round. Backyard dinner parties, bonfires on the beach or outdoor movie nights are just some hyggelig summer activities.

The Outdoor Bliss

In contrast to cold Scandinavian countries, Australia enjoys plenty of sunshine, and is home to the most amazing landscapes. Australian lifestyle is free-spirited and easy-going; Australians don’t take their home for granted and consider themselves extremely lucky. Like the Danes, Aussies, as well, love spending time in the company of friends and family, they enjoy good humor, laid-back gatherings and friendly atmosphere.
With Sydney and Melbourne who year after year are battling over the title of the world’s most liveable city, Australia is persistently scoring high in international quality of life and happiness surveys. Furthermore, Australia was named the world’s happiest nation by the OECD for three years in a row, starting 2013. So, it looks like Australians have a lot in common with the Danes. Only, Australians don’t have a unique word to articulate their wellbeing.

But what could be the Australian equivalent of Hygge?

One thing is sure, if we would look for those special moments of happiness in Australia, the indoors are not a place to start. It’s more likely that the path would take us to the backyards and in the gardens; it would take us along the beaches, to the lakes and river shores. We could hear loud murmurs of joy in the shades of trees in the parks, under the gazebos at the beaches, and in the hypnotising sound of the ocean.
Outdoor living is Australia’s state of mind; it’s the fount of the simplest daily joys and the greatest and wildest adventures. There is a feeling that anyone living in Australia would recognize; a feeling of deep appreciation for the amazing surroundings and the unique atmosphere about it.
It does not surprise then, that blurring the line between indoors and outdoors is the imperative and favorite design statement in Australia.

CLICK ON EACH PRODUCT TO FIND OUT MORE!

Click on each product to find out more!

Over the last few years, Denmark positioned itself as one of the happiest countries in the world. To the people of Denmark, there is a strong link between happiness and the single word that communicates so much -“Hygge”.

According to Meik Wiking from the Happiness Research Institute in Copenhagen whose book “The Little Book of Hygee; The Danish Way to Live Well”, was among 2017’s world bestsellers.

“Danes are the happiest people in Europe according to the European Social Survey, but they are also the ones who meet most often with their friends and family and feel the calmest and most peaceful. Therefore, it is with good reason that we see a growing interest in hygge. Journalists are touring Denmark searching for Hygge; in the UK, a college is now teaching Danish Hygge; and around the world hygge bakeries, shops and cafes are popping up”’.

Hygge (hoo-ga) doesn’t directly translate to English, but it can be explained as comfort, togetherness, warmth. Hygge is particularly practised during the winter season when deprived of sun rays, and natural daylight Danes turn to the cosiness of their homes in the company of family and friends. They invest in the atmosphere rather than in things and celebrate simple pleasures in life; like having hot cocoa by the candlelight or a relaxing movie night with friends.

Although the winter season naturally provides the most hyggelig (hygge-like) moments, Danes enjoy hygge all year round. Backyard dinner parties, bonfires on the beach or outdoor movie nights are just some hyggelig summer activities.

Outdoor Bliss   

In contrast to cold Scandinavia, Australia enjoys plenty of sunshine and it is, home to most amazing landscapes. Australian lifestyle is free-spirited and easy going, and Australians don’t take their home for granted and consider themselves extremly lucky.  Like Danes, Aussies, as well, love spending time in the company of friends and family, they enjoy the humour, relaxed conversations and friendly atmosphere. And like in Denmark, the best things in life in Australia are free, too.

With Sydney and Melbourne who year after year are battling over the title of the world’s most liveable city, Australia is persistently scoring high in international quality of life and happiness surveys. Furthermore, Australia was named the world’s happiest nation by the OECD for three years in a row, starting 2013. So, it looks like Danes are not that much happier than Australians. The only difference is that Australians don’t have the word to describe it (yet).

But what could be Australian equal for Hygge?

One thing is certain if we were to go looking for those special moments of happiness in Australia, the indoors are not a place to start. It’s more likely that the path would take us to the backyards or by the pools; it would take us along the beaches, to the lakes and river shores. We could hear loud murmurs of joy in the shades of trees in the parks, under the gazebos at the beaches and in the hypnotising sound of the ocean.